Quantcast
Since 1999, the premier source for coaching job information


undercenter
Pac-12 has answer to "QB Camp"
acramsbutton
Very unique HS helmets
Late Night Seth Meyers
What you can learn from Late Night


7 assistants - 215 schools- 5 days

Gus Malzahn made a recruiting announcement this morning that seven of his Arkansas State assistant coaches are hitting the road in what's being called the "A-State Ambush".

The goal of the recruiting blitz is to visit all 215 football playing schools in the state of Arkansas in the next 5 days. That means every powerhouse who churns out DI recruit after DI recruit, as well as the schools that have never produced a Division I athlete.

He wasn't kidding at his introductory press conference when he said he was going to recruit the state of Arkansas like it had never been done before.

“I want them to know that our doors are always open for them here at Arkansas State,” Malzahn said about visiting all 215 schools. “I want them to know that even if they never have a kid that can play college ball that they are still very important to us and our program. I want them to know that they can come study our film, watch our practices and be a part of our program.”

“There are no better high school coaches in America than they are right here in the state of Arkansas, I truly believe that.”

“I don’t think it has ever been done before,” he added. “I know it hasn’t been done in just five days.”

a-state-ambush




The Art of hiring a new head coach

Bud Withers of the Seattle Times wrote a very interesting article about the challenges involved in the modern day hiring process of finding a new leader for your football team. This one is worth your time.

The initial focus is on how Bill Moos, Washington State's athletic director, went about hiring Mike Leach; but Withers touches on aspects of the searches at Arizona, UCLA and Arizona State as well. 

Easily the best quote of the entire piece comes from Moos (who we have already proclaimed the AD of the Year). Withers writes:

Moos says candidly that some hires left him scratching his head. "There's the Charlie Weis deal," he says of Kansas' hire. "He failed miserably at Notre Dame, but, 'By God, he was at Notre Dame.' Down at Ole Miss, they have to have 15 people on a search committee (actually it was five). By the time they get through the introductions on the search committee, all the good coaches are hired. I don't need 15 people sitting at the table. Where are the other 14 when I get evaluated on (the performance of) my football coach?"

Bill, let us know your address and we'll send you the award. 




Saving lives at Salve Regina

Salve Regina head coach Bob Chesney has a crystal clear big picture idea on how to run a football program; and giving back to the community is a huge part of that picture.

Chesney, inspired by the work of Villanova head football coach Andy Talley, partnered with the Be The Match registry to help organize a campus wide bone marrow drive.

The football team was out in full force, informing people and directing them to the Rec Center where donor registration was taking place.

Coach Talley has been involved in raising awareness for bone marrow transplants since 1992 when he was first told of the struggles facing the 10,000 people in need of bone marrow transplants. The chances of those affected actually finding an available donor is as low as 66%.

In 2010 Talley started his own non-profit organization called the "Andy Talley Bone Marrow Foundation" and has been able to enlist the help of 29 other college football programs, like Salve Regina, to lead bone marrow registry drives on their own campuses across the country. In 2010 Talley set out to get 5,000 new registrants, when all was said and done, they had added 8,800. Needless to say, he's passionate about the mission.

For his program at Salve Regina, Chesney aims to develop well rounded individuals. "It's not just about football. It's not just about the academics. That's something that we preach a lot to every kid that comes in here. We also want you to be pretty good off the field as well, and in the community. So what better way to reach out and really get involved in the community and make ourselves and our school proud." 

One of the organizers commended the use of athletics to get spread the word, saying that "One of the benefits of working with an athletics team, is that they're already organized, they're used to doing community service and a lot of times the coaches are passionate about getting involved in other things affect their community."

Take a look at what Chesney and the team were able to put together to raise awareness on their campus.




Nick Aliotti wins the day

Recently ESPN the magazine came out with an article stating that a lot of students at Oregon smoke grass. 

Defensive coordinator Nick Aliotti took it all in stride in a recent interview, and is even able to get a few laughs, all while continuing to handle the situation with class.

Well played coach.




How GA's blow off steam at Utah State

The Aggies have been working their tails off this spring, so the coaches decided to hold a little dance off at practice to blow off some steam.

The players enter the ring and showcase their skills, and then grad assistants Vince Natali and Spencer Toone get in on the action.

The rest you have to see for yourself.




This coach get's it

Western Michigan defensive coordinator Rich Nagy is in his first season as the Bronco's defensive coordinator; but read the quotes in the next paragraph and tell me he doesn't get it. He nailed it!

"Coaching is coaching. In the past 5 or 6 years, I think you see changes, just like society" Nagy said during the most recent Inside the Lines special. "I think the coaching part, and the kids needing coaching, hasn't changed. I think they need leadership, I think they need role models, I think they need structure, I think they need discipline."

Nagy talks about his family for a bit, noting that he's not sure if his youngest kid is at an age where she can fully realize what he does for a living. "I think they've started to realize that I go to an office, but my office is a little different than most peoples". He added that his youngest has noticed that there are a lot of "football boys" hanging around the office...and he's either going to the office to work with them, or he's out on the road looking for more of them.




Recruiting: The difference between the north and south

Texas A&M tight ends coach / special teams coordinator Brian Polian has noticed some interesting recruiting perks as a new member of the SEC.

“To be able to separate ourselves from all of the other schools in the state by telling a young man, ‘Hey, we’re not playing Iowa State, Kansas State and Kansas, we’re playing LSU, Auburn and Florida’...that’s pretty powerful” he commented.

Polian has noticed one change in particular between northern high schools and Texas high schools that he could definitely get used to.

“Doing a lot of recruiting up north, you’re used to, ‘Where is the head football coach?’ ‘Well, he’s teaching English. Come back at 3.’"

“I’ve found at these 5A schools in Texas, that’s not the case. It’s, ‘Go on back to the field house. He’s waiting for you, Coach.’ That’s been a nice surprise.”




Weis practicing how to win

Yesterday, Kansas had a 6 a.m. practice that ended unlike any other so far this spring.

To wrap up practice, Charlie Weis brings out the kicker to simulate a game winning field goal. Attempt #1 misses. Attempt #2 sails through the uprights and the sideline clears in celebration. Sounds like every other game winning practice celebration at first...right?

Not so fast.

Weis has the players clear the field. Needless to say he wasn't happy with the celebration, and addressed the situation saying, “I can tell you guys aren’t used to winning."

"Winning a football game is not supposed to be an uncommon occurrence. I know that’s a novel concept around here. OK. When you win a football game, there’s supposed to be a celebration that looks like a celebration. And that was a pile of crap."

"I believe in practicing everything, including winning. That’s what this is all about."

“This is about, third game of the season, you’re sitting here 2-0. You’re playing TCU...and you hit a field goal to win the game. Act that way!”

To really experience it, you've got to see the entire video, which can be found here.