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Video: Malzahn runs "no huddle bingo"
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Dabo's response to "too religious"
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UCLA has a new facility planned


Manny Diaz offers up a few gems

When it comes to offering up gems to the media, a few of the coaches whos names come to mind are Mike Leach, Mike Gundy, and Lane Kiffin.

Reporters that cover Texas football would add defensive coordinator Manny Diaz to that elite list.

In their press conference on Monday, Diaz dropped a few lines that were definitely noteworthy.

For example, when asked about Steve Edmond, a 255 pound sophomore making his first start at linebacker, Diaz said, "The first thing I want to see Steve do is be where he’s supposed to be. Everybody’s waiting for the moment where he, like, eats the quarterback’s head or whatever.”

When one reporter asked about "hybrid" type players, Diaz responded, "I think that’s a cool word, you know what I mean? I get told by recruits, ‘Hey, I’m a hybrid.’ I’m like, ‘Do I plug you in at night and get better gas mileage?’ … It’s all about speed. When someone says you’re a hybrid, that just means you’re fast for your size.”

And maybe the best of the group, when a reporter, who was obviously following the same line of questions asked before about the team, asked "So are you a lot faster this year?" 

Diaz responded simply..."Me personally? I’m the same.”




A few policy changes in the Big 12 and SEC

12A few changes in policy, including instant replays and when bands are allowed to play, have quietly made their way to the Big 12 and SEC.

This season, fans at games will see replays similar to what viewers at home see.

In SEC country, stadiums can show the plays in question from the end of one play until the beginning of the next.

The Big 12 will handle controversial replays a little differently, allowing stadiums to show a replay up to three times.

As Big 12 associate commissioner for communications Bob Burda explains, “It includes plays that are under review, but also foul / penalties that have or haven’t been called, timing decisions at the end of game or other situations that would fall under the category of controversial play.”

In previous years, the two conferences only allowed one instant replay of a play in question. 

Also, the SEC announced that bands will now be able to play from when the play is whistled dead, up until the point where the center takes his place at the line of scrimmage. Previously bands were not allowed play once the offensive team broke the huddle and were also not allowed to be amplified during games.

It will be interesting to see the reaction of a Death Valley crowd when they're able to see a controversial call over and over again. 

 




Franklin: The only game I know on our schedule is South Carolina

James Franklin joined the guys on College Sports Nation via SiriusXM radio earlier today.

One host asked Franklin about their schedule, and mentioned that they don't face Alabama or LSU this year, and Franklin jokingly responded by saying "Well...you know more than me."

"A lot of coaches talk about 'one game at a time', but they don't really live it. We live it."

"The only game that I know is really on the schedule is South Carolina, I don't even know what's after that."

"Once the administration schedules the second opponent after the first one and tells us who we're playing then we'll start worrying about that."

"I think that's one of the things that we've done a really good job of and why we were able to play at such a high level, and stay consistent all year long, was that we truly did that. We break it down even further than that and say that the average college football play is 6 seconds at time."

"I think that when you first come to a place like Vanderbilt you can get overwhelmed with the enormity of the job but if you break it down into the small elements like we do then you just focus on being great for six seconds at a time."

South Carolina will take on Vanderbilt in Nashville Thursday night at 7.

 




How to "Haka"

Arizona defensive lineman Sione Tuihalamaka and his "Polyzona" teammates would like to show us all how to Haka. 

Good lesson. Thanks. 

'Zona staff, please get Rich Rod to do this at least once this season. 




See practice through the eyes of QB

Some good GoPro helmet cam footage here from Northern Illinois and quarterback Jordan Lynch.

Observe exactly how Lynch sees things and how the team works through their last two a day practice before they shift their focus to Iowa, who they'll take on Saturday at 3:30.




Leach: Coaches practice just like players

Mike Leach was asked if he was excited to be back on the sideline for the first time since 2009 after practice last night.

Leach responded by saying, "I've been practicing it everyday for over a month."

"It's really not that new. It's just like players practice, coaches practice. So it's not like any of it is new. I've just got to do the same thing in the game that I did in practice, just like they do."




Impressive video from Azusa Pacific

Really well put together video here from Azusa Pacific, who is making the move to D-II. The video highlights head Victor Santa Cruz and how the Cougar program is winning games and changing lives.

This is one of those videos that helps remind us of the big picture and why we do what we do as coaches. 

"God gave us just one life. We are not going to waste it on mediocrity. We are going to run to be the best." Santa Cruz notes during the clip.




"We have to master the things that require no talent"

On the field at Camp Randall, in front of 80,000 fans among the loudest in the country, communication's importance can't be stressed enough.

Co-defensive coordinator Chris Ash pointed out communication's importance, using their loss against Ohio State, where a breakdown in communication in the secondary allowed Ohio State to go ahead with under 30 seconds left on the clock. 

“Communication doesn’t require talent. That’s the No. 1 thing we’ve got to master, the things that require no talent. That’s one of them.” 

However, it's not easy. Processing the personnel, formation, defensive call and down and distance while under the gun on game day takes plenty of repetition, Ash notes.

“You have to process it first before you can communicate it. The great ones, they can process it faster.”

“Out here, it’s easy. On game day in the environment of Camp Randall Stadium, it’s a whole ’nother thing. We try to stress it, but you never know until you get to gameday.”