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Meyer on missed tackles: We've got to stop, or we'll lose a game

During their 35-28 win over Cal on Saturday, the Ohio State defense gave up a total of 512 yards. Cal gained over half of that yardage (260 yards) on six big plays.

The concern that Urban Meyer had after reviewing the game film stemmed from poor tackling, something that he said would get addressed this week.

"Instead of one day a week, we'll probably have to go two now." Urban said about their practice plan for the week.

"That's not acceptable. That is the most alarming thing. I can't remember an Ohio State defense, I've watched them for a long time, and I can't remember the defense I've been around that's given up this many. We've got to stop or we'll lose a game."

Meyer also noted that their emphasis on forcing turnovers may have also played a role.

"We make a huge emphasis on stripping the ball. If you watch one of those tackles, it looked like the guy was going after the ball instead of wrapping him up. So we've addressed that and we'll have more conversation about that."

Ohio State (3-0) welcomes UAB (0-2) to the Horseshoe on Saturday, marking the fourth straight home game for the Buckeyes. Next weekend they'll travel up to East Lansing to open Big Ten play against the Spartans.




Coughlin uses inspiring video to illustrate their 2011 motto - "Finish"

Really good video here from ESPN explaining the back story on how the New York Giants got their motto, "Finish", before last season.

Right after the lockout ended, Tom Coughlin showed this video to the team, which illustrated the motto he and the staff had chosen for 2011, and as the players explain, helped lay the foundation for their championship season.

Pretty inspiring story.




Michigan State All-Access: Notre Dame week

Michigan State has once again put together a quality "All-Access" video highlighting the team and staff while they prepared for Notre Dame last week.

The clip goes inside the meeting room with running backs coach Brad Salem and his guys during the week, and explains why playing on the offensive line is the best preparation for life after football. 

Michigan State Communications teamed up with a production company called Second Wind Creative to put together these videos that creatively tell the story of the season. These guys do a great job and you can see why this series is considered one of the better produced All-Access series around. To learn more about Second Wind Creative, and what they can do for your program, visit this link.




A look inside Florida's facilities

Video walk through of the facilities. 

It was nice of offensive line coach Tim Davis to dress up for the video (we kid, settle down people). 

Nice love in the video for assistant athletic director for football operations George Wynn who played with Muschamp at Georgia and came with him from Texas. 

Finally, we can not recommend anyone from ESPN productions to watch this video as they might freak out for the near lack of Tim Tebow mentions (a few in the trophy room early on; but we didn't see one after the first two minutes). 




Banning players from using Twitter for five years is a bad decision

Earlier today ESPN's Darren Rovell tweeted that Old Dominion head coach Bobby Wilder has banned every player from using twitter for as long as they are part of the program. To our knowledge this is a first in collegiate athletics. 

According to this article on HamptonRoads.com, Wilder has implemented a complete Twitter ban for his players. Year round. As long as they are part of the team. As one incoming freshman tweeted, "Signing off. See you guys in about five years."

The article notes that Florida State, Clemson, South Carolina and Boise State have told their players not to tweet during the season; but according to a social media expert whose company teaches athletes how to use social media, this move by Wilder is the first such year round, multi year ban. 

The article quotes Wilder as saying, "It [Twitter] was affecting our grades. It was hindering the academic performance of some of our players." Wilder allows his players to have Facebook pages but they must friend ODU's football page.  "I want them to have their freedom," Wilder said. "They should have Facebook relationships with their family and their friends." 

We pulled up some quick Twitter research and noted that Twitter usage by 18-24 year olds doubled in the 15 months leading up to February 2012. Independent research estimated that 31% of 18-24 year olds use Twitter and their daily usage of it has grown 5x over the same time frame. Presumably if you were to look at the % of just college enrollees using Twitter the percentage would be significantly higher; and that 31% was back in February. Believe it or not, in just the past seven months, we think that percentage has probably grown a lot closer to, and maybe even over, 50%. 

We haven't spoken with Wilder about his decision; but on it's face this doesn't seem to be the right course. If the goal as coaches is to educate our student athletes and to prepare them for the real world...remember all those NCAA ads about 99% of us will go pro in something other than athletics?...is not allowing them to use Twitter for five years the right thing to do? Absolutely not. Each of the recruits they are bringing in now, if they don't actually use Twitter for the next five years, will be at a significant disadvantage to their peers when it comes to knowledge of the platform and the technology...and all of the innovation spurred by the technology. 

Why not choose to educate the players about social media, teach them to use it responsibly and monitor their compliance within the standards the team already has in place for conduct?  

Further, and we'd put this way down the list, what are the odds that opposing teams will use this 5 year Twitter ban against ODU in recruiting??? Well, judging by the texts that I received today, we're pretty sure it will be mentioned frequently on the recruiting trail. 

In an ironic twist, it was pointed out to us this afternoon to many of Wilder's assistants use Twitter (some of whom were tweeting today). 

I would encourage every program to educate and instill responsibility in your players (and staff). Have established standards and monitor for compliance. But don't put your student athletes at a five year disadvantage by taking away what is an everyday technology that is absolutely essential in today's world and will be even more critical five years from now. 

 




Tuesday TV - No Action tonight; but MACtion tomorrow night

No games tonight, but we do have some MACtion scheduled for tomorrow night.

Eastern time.

NFL:

No games

College:

No games

High School:

No games




Dooley: I told the team, you can't pick what kind of adversity you hit

Derek Dooley noted during his press conference today that "you can't pick what kind of adversity you go hit", referring to the 21 point swing that they saw over the weekend against Florida, including two touchdowns that went for 75 yards or more.

As Dooley explains, "There was a moment there were there were too many people not listening to the voice of reason."

"I think it's fair to say that when we went down 14 there was a level, in everybody, of shock. We're sitting there in total command of the game and all of a sudden 21 points go on the board before we can even catch our breath." 




"The hardest thing to do on defense is tackle in the open field"

When Chip Kelly was the offensive coordinator at New Hampshire, he went down to visit the offensive staff at Clemson to figure out how to better use his one back scheme in the coming season.

The Tiger's offensive coordinator at that time was Rich Rodriguez. The two shared some ideas that evolved and eventually played a major role in how their offenses took shape over the years. Kelly returned to New Hampshire with the zone read, which is something that has continued to be a staple of his offenses for years.

This weekend, the two coaches will square of for the first time in their careers, and each of them will be bringing a ranked team with them.

“I think we traded a lot of ideas. He got our film and we got his film." Rodriguez said when reflecting back on that meeting. "We do some similar things, and then we do some things differently. Chip obviously has done a great job with it."

“I think philosophically, Chip is probably the closest to what we believe in offensively and how to go about it than anyone else out there.”

While they each have their own differences, Rodriguez explains that one principle remains the same.

"The main philosophy is us getting fast guys the ball in space. Whether you’re throwing it to them or handing off to them, you’re trying to get the guys the ball in space."

"The single hardest thing to do on defense is tackle in the open field.