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Video: Malzahn runs "no huddle bingo"
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Dabo's response to "too religious"
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UCLA has a new facility planned


Marrone does up-downs at practice

After a 5-7 season last year, the word of the off season seems to have been "accountability" for Doug Marrone at Syracuse.

So after a mistake during practice yesterday, Marrone held himself accountable and did a handful of down ups.

After forgetting what session came next, practice grinded to a halt while Marrone got his bearings. Next thing you know Marrone drops to the ground and reps out five down ups.

“I made a mistake. We hold the players accountable for their own actions, so if I make a mistake I have to hold myself accountable just like the players,” Marrone explained.

When a reporter asked the last time he had done up-downs, he had to flash back to his playing days.

“Probably when Coach Mac was here. We would have to do 25 before each practice. Coach Mac would’ve been proud. I don’t know if I could have done 25, but the ones I did were to Coach Mac’s standards.”




Arizona's leadership training

The Wildcats visited Fort Hauchuca over the weekend to participate in some team building activities to build team chemistry.

This stuff wasn't easy, but the players were forced to to think outside of the box to solve issues with their teammates, and looks like they had a ton of fun doing so.




Players explain Lou-phobia at UNC

During the first week of workouts under Lou Hernandez at North Carolina, players admitted to being sluggish and vomiting. 

Since then, players have adapted to the changes in philosophy and have come up with a few nicknames for the workouts (including our personal favorite "Lou-90x") as well as a name for the fear of the workouts, and Coach Lou himself, with Lou-phobia. Clever.

On a more serious note, hear Coach Lou explain the tempo and some specific philosophies of the weightroom in Chapel Hill in the clip.




Kentucky coaches & linemen doing flips at the pool

Joker gets his flips in early; but the big winner comes at the end of this clip. 

Grab your popcorn!




Tulane co-DC: "When my senior's not doing something right I'm gonna be choking him"

Good "mic'd up" video below featuring Tulane's co-defensive coordinator Jon Sumrall.

Sumrall's a great guy, excellent coach. His players are going to enjoy playing for him.

The entire video is good and shows a lot of his style; but we've got it tee'd up to show you the last 30 seconds or so in which he's got his defensive linemen circled up. Sumrall's constantly coaching them up throughout practice and here at the end he's telling them it's not personal; that he trying to get them to be as good as they can be...but with some humor thrown in he stresses that if his senior leader isn't performing then he's going to be on "top of him, choking him".

Again, we've got the last 30 seconds tee'd up below. At the end hit replay and watch the entire thing to learn more about Sumrall's style. Sumrall was an excellent hire by CJ. 




360º field level look at TCU's stadium

Steve Wilson took this panorama today on the field.

Pretty cool technology and the stadium is really coming along. Those "Founders" suites right about 20 rows up have got to be a great place to take in a game. 




SI explains the "Sabanization of college football"

Andy Staples over at ESPN put out a piece today explaining the "Sabanization of college football".

The article is very well done and explains a few of Saban's methods including what has become known in coaching circles as "the Process".

As Staples explains, "Instead of talking about wins and championships, Saban speaks about the Process. In its most basic form, the Process is Saban's term for concentrating on the steps to success rather than worrying about the end result."

"Instead of thinking about the scoreboard, think about dominating the man on the opposite side of the line of scrimmage. Instead of thinking about a conference title, think about finishing a ninth rep in the weight room. Instead of thinking about graduating, think about writing a great paper for Intro to Psych."

You'll hear the same from many of the coaches that have worked under Saban. It's all about the process.

Staples also gives some insight on how coaches under Saban evaluate talent, and where some of Saban's philosophies come from, including how to develop the entire student athlete; personally, mentally and morally.

This is an oustanding read, and the full piece can be read here.

 




Holgo: Don't act like a true freshman, get better

With only a week left in fall camp, Dana Holgorsen has noted that the staff has done a great job recruiting players up front that can physically handle what they're asking them to do, but the mental part of the game is starting to catch up to them.

"They're starting to spin a little bit. It's catching up to them." Holgo said about the mental load early on.

"Our second-team offense looks terrible. They look awful. That's what we're dealing with on offense where you put the second team in and you have a bunch of true freshmen. They don't need to act like true freshmen, they need to get better."

"Defensively, it's the same thing, but we're not having to put a bunch of true freshmen in on the offensive side, we're having to put freshmen in on the defensive side, and they need to keep getting better like our second team."

Holgo explained that instead of plugging in the young guys with the second team, you'd ideally want to redshirt them and give them an extra year to develop.

"Hopefully we don't have to play those guys. You want to red shirt 'O' linemen. Physically they're up to speed. Mentally it's going to take some time. We'll keep repping them."

Thinking back, Holgorsen noted that he can think of only one player that could shoulder the full load as a true freshman on the offensive line.

"We'll play true freshmen on the [defensive] line, secondary, some receivers, always played running backs. The O line is the one that's hard. Probably only had one guy do it in the last two years."