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Meet USC assistants Tommie Robinson and Mike Summers

While the rest of college football is moving further and further away, the traditional under center, pro-style offense still has a big fan in new USC passing game coordinator/running backs coach Tommie Robinson. And Robinson is a fan because someone else believes in the pro-style attack: the NFL.

"Me coming from the Arizona Cardinals in the NFL, it's my style of offense," Robinson said. "This is my background. We're a two-back, two-tight end kind of team, spread the ball out when we have to, when we need to. It's a mirror image of what the vast majority of the NFL is doing. It fit me well."

Robinson, who most recently spent three years with the Arizona Cardinals, has made previous coaching stops at Miami, Memphis, Oklahoma State, UNLV, TCU, Utah State and Arkansas as well as with the Dallas Cowboys.

The letters N, F and L have permeated in another one of Lane Kiffin's offseason hires. Former Kentucky, Arkansas, Atlanta Falcons and Louisville assistant Mike Summers was hired as the Trojans' running game coordinator and offensive line coach, joining existing offensive line coach James Cregg.

"It's been great to bring him in with Coach Cregg. They've worked well together," said head coach Lane Kiffin. "We split the guys up at times, they go to different drills. It's really important. It's why, in the NFL, everybody has two line coaches, it's a very critical position. Five guys play every snap and to have two guys working with those guys has really been great for us this spring."

"The offensive line is the foundation for being able to facilitate our offense. If we do our job then our quarterbacks have time to do what they have to do. We've got receivers that can do special things with the ball and we've got running backs that can do special things with the ball in their hand, so it's our job to be fundamentally sound, to be able to create space and to be able to finish," Summers said. 

Each coached quickly grasped the urgency within the program following a season in which the preseason No. 1 Trojans dropped five of their final six games on their way to a 7-6 season. "That finish part of this game is something that separates good teams from average teams," Summers said.

"Seven wins is not what the USC nation expects and our expectation is certainly not that, either," Robinson added. 

Author: Zach Barnett
Zach Barnett is a native of Denton, Texas and a graduate of the University of Texas. He joined FootballScoop in 2012 after two years at the National Football Foundation. His hobbies include watching college football, reading about college football and writing about college football.