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Examining defensive coordinator salaries in the Big Ten

Word broke on Monday that Michigan defensive coordinator Greg Mattison, already one of the highest-paid assistants in college football, would vault further into the upper echelon of assistants with a three-year contract extension that will pay him up to $2.825 million.

According to Michigan beat writer Kyle Meinke, will make $750,000 in 2013, the final year of his original contract for joining Brady Hoke's staff. Mattison's salary will jump to $835,000 in 2014, $875,000 in 2015 and $915,000 in 2016. Additionally, he will receive a $200,000 retention bonus if he remains in Ann Arbor through the life of the contract. 

Meinke reports Mattison will receive small bumps in incentives when the extension kicks in. He will make $25,000 for helping lead Michigan to a bowl game (up from $22,500), $40,000 for a non-BCS New Year's Day bowl game (up from $37,500) and $100,000 if the Wolverines reach the Big Ten title game (up from $90,000). His Big Ten championship bonus remains steady at $150,000.

According to the USA Today database, here is how defensive coordinator salaries stack up in the Big Ten. You won't be surprised by the schools at the top, although the name at the bottom should raise an eyebrow. 

1. Luke Fickell, Ohio State - $750,000
    Greg Mattison, Michigan - $750,000
3. Pat Narduzzi, Michigan State - $501,700
4. Dave Aranda, Wisconsin - $480,000
5. Tim Banks, Illinois - $400,000
6. Greg Hudson, Purdue - $395,000
7. Tracy Claeys, Minnesota - $340,000
8. Doug Mallory, Indiana - $306,600
9. Phil Parker, Iowa - $301,500
10. John Papuchis, Nebraska - $300,000

John Butler, Penn State - N/A
Mike Hankwitz, Northwestern - N/A

 

Author: Zach Barnett
Zach Barnett is a native of Denton, Texas and a graduate of the University of Texas. He joined FootballScoop in 2012 after two years at the National Football Foundation. His hobbies include watching college football, reading about college football and writing about college football.