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Spurrier: 'Your ability to perform in life is not based on age'

Steve Spurrier appeared on Tim Brando's radio show on Friday and was asked a question that all 67-year-old coaches get asked, how much longer he was planning on coaching.

"Your ability to perform your profession in life is not based on age, it's based on your physical and mental fitness," said Spurrier. "I'm trying to keep my physical and mental fitness as sharp as I can."

Spurrier had explained earlier in the interview that he has been telling reporters he plans on coaching "four or five" more years since he was 55, a full dozen years ago. 

"Coaching is timing. After the Washington Redskins deal was over, I was looking to go somehwere in the SEC, maybe somewhere that had the opportunity to win big but hadn't won much in the past. This was the perfect place," he said. 

After bouncing between six and eight wins in his first five seasons, Spurrier went 9-5 in 2010 and has posted back-to-back 11-2 campaigns in 2011 and 2012. "We haven't won that game in Atlanta yet," Spurrier added. 

With Doug Marrone leaving Syracuse for the Buffalo Bills and a handful of other college coaches garnering NFL interest, Spurrier was asked for his perpsective on the college football-to-NFL jump.

"I think what happens to most college coaches is your goal is to coach 10, maybe 15, years in college... and then maybe go coach in the NFL five, maybe seven or eight years, and then hang it up," Spurrier explained. "That's certainly the mentality I had... It is a tough grind up there. You get draft picks up there, you can't go recruit. The team that wins the Super Bowl gets the last pick in the draft. Alabama gets the first 20 picks in college football."

Author: Zach Barnett
Zach Barnett is a native of Denton, Texas and a graduate of the University of Texas. He joined FootballScoop in 2012 after two years at the National Football Foundation. His hobbies include watching college football, reading about college football and writing about college football.