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Should your offensive and defensive philosophies mirror each other?

Auburn defensive coordinator Brian VanGorder explained yesterday that part of their struggles on the defensive side of the ball have to do with not being physically big enough to hang with their opponents for a full sixty minutes.

"I'm from the school of 'big.'" VanGorder explains.

"I think that I am right in that. I think if you look at the NFL there was one defense that was built with the idea of small and fast, and it was a defense that was built with a high scoring offense that was ahead all the time. And it worked, I'm speaking of Indianapolis."

"It's a heavyweight game. It's for big people, and strong people, and we've got to improve in that area."

That brings up an interesting point. Depending on what level your coaching at, do you (or should you) adjust your offensive or defensive philosophies (and ultimately your recruiting strategy) based on what the other side of the ball does?

Take what VanGorder says in the clip for example; If you've got an offense that puts a ton of points on the board and is up and down the field in a hurry, wouldn't it make sense to have smaller, faster guys out there on defense? And on the flip side of that, if you've got an offense that is big and physical and can grind it out each week, isn't there some value in having a big and physical defense as well?

We're interested to hear your thoughts on this one.

Author: Doug Samuels
Doug Samuels has been with FootballScoop since 2011. Samuels joined the FootballScoop staff after serving as a college scout as well as an assistant coach at the college level, where he was fortunate enough to have coached every offensive position by age 24. Samuels is a lifelong Michigan State fan, no huddle enthusiast, and currently coaches high school football in West Michigan.