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Clint Hurtt to remain at Louisville despite NCAA penalty

Perhaps the most shocking revelation from the NCAA's finding on the Miami investigation today has nothing to do with Miami at all. 

Here are the facts:

- Louisville defensive line coach Clint Hurtt was given a two-year "show-cause" penalty from the NCAA for his part in Nevin Shapiro scandal during his time on the Miami staff (2001-2009). From the Courier Journal:

Hurtt, currently the Cardinals’ associate head coach in charge of recruiting and the defensive line, received and provided impermissible benefits to recruits while at Miami, according to the NCAA. The organization also found that Hurtt and another former Miami assistant provided false and misleading information to its investigators, known formally as the 10.1 unethical conduct rule violation.

- Despite the show-cause, Hurtt will continue to coach at Louisville thanks to athletics director Tom Jurich's pitch to the NCAA that the Cardinals will employ "further actions" on Hurtt which Jurich announced the NCAA has accepted. 

- Those "further actions" entail a pay freeze through May 20, 2015. Hurtt makes $350,000 now, up from $200,000 when he joined the staff in 2010.

- He will also have a zero tolerance policy on any violations. But it will be virtually impossible for Hurtt to commit any major or secondary violations because....

- Hurtt is barred from recruiting through June.  

That means Hurtt will spend the next seven months getting paid at or above market value to do nothing but coach defensive line and not participate in closing the 2014 recruiting class as well as the 2014 spring evaluation period.

And, remember, this is supposed to be Clint Hurtt's punishment. 

Author: Zach Barnett
Zach Barnett is a native of Denton, Texas and a graduate of the University of Texas. He joined FootballScoop in 2012 after two years at the National Football Foundation. His hobbies include watching college football, reading about college football and writing about college football.