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Todd Monken has a proposal for those calling for 'power conferences'

The past few off seasons, and this last one in particular, has seen the chatter behind forming "power conferences" pick up more and more steam.

Todd Monken, in his first season at Southern Miss, has a proposal for those fans and coaches seriously considering taking college football down that path.

"I would propose to [the power conferences] this: If you want to split off, let's just do it that way, but you play each other, and you don't get to play us then," Monken said in the Sun Sentinel.

"Go ahead. See how you like that. See how you like the NFL rule and play each other every week. Coaches will be like 'Whoa, hold on, wait a second now.' Go ahead and do your deal...you guys split all the pie... but don't go playing anyone else. You just play each other every week. Just have a nice NFL crossover where you play each other. Then when you fire up a nice 7-5, and you're at a pretty good place and they fire you, they won't be real excited about it, because you won't have those games that they've been able to win. Plain and simple."

"Some of those teams that get bowl eligible when they go 2-6 in their league and they go 6-6. Well, you'll be 2-10, or 3-9, and it won't feel so damn salty." Monken added that he also sees that smaller schools are offering themselves up to the bigger schools in most cases, and with the money that the smaller schools make in the match ups, you can forget about a school like Michigan or Alabama even considering playing at a smaller venue.

"Schools at our level, until we get done prostituting ourselves, are never going to really see those teams to come play you [at their home field]," Monken added. "They pay you enough to where you won't come. They'll find enough people so that you'll come. I bet you'll find the records of schools in our league are pretty good when they get to play teams at home. They just don't get to play them at home, but 'cause they need the money or someone else will do it. That's the biggest thing...how do you get to where you give yourself a shot, and make them travel?"

Monken brings up some excellent points here. In college football, home field advantage can mean a ton, especially for a small school that has to travel and play in a venue that holds 5 times more rabid fans. If put into place, Monken's proposal would likely also have a huge impact on the coaching turnover in those perceived "power conferences" as well because coaches will no longer have games on their schedule that they've been able to win to pad their win-loss record.

Author: Doug Samuels
Doug Samuels has been with FootballScoop since 2011. Samuels joined the FootballScoop staff after serving as a college scout as well as an assistant coach at the college level, where he was fortunate enough to have coached every offensive position by age 24. Samuels is a lifelong Michigan State fan, no huddle enthusiast, and currently coaches high school football in West Michigan.