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Even with his connections, Sean Payton couldn't stop the pee wee single wing

Ask coaches around the country what the hardest offense in the country is to stop and you'll likely get votes for every offense imaginable, as well as a few coaching cliches along the way.

According to Grantland writer (and FootballScoop Video of the Year judge) Chris Brown, if you ask Sean Payton, his answer is likely going to be the single wing. During his one year away from football Payton spent time coaching his son's team, the Liberty Christian Warriors, who went on to win the league title but ended the season with two losses, both to the same team. That team was the Springtown Orange Porcupines. who won the first contest 38-16 running, you guessed it, the single wing.

After that loss Payton did what any forward thinking head coach (at any level) would do, he used his connections to find some creative ways to stop one football's original offenses.

"We spent all week, we talked to Bill Parcells and Jon Gruden and asked them how to defend the single wing. You have no idea how much time we spent." Payton told both teams after getting beat 58-18 in the second game.

For those of you keeping track, that's 96 points in two games given up to the old single wing.

All coaches have an achilles heel...maybe Payton had to go down to the pee wee level to find one of his in the single wing. With this information out there, it will be interesting to see if any NFL offensive coordinators dust off an old single wing playbook to use against Payton and Saints defensive coordinator Rob Ryan this fall.

As always, Grantland has a quality take on the story. Read the entire thing here.

Author: Doug Samuels
Doug Samuels has been with FootballScoop since 2011. Samuels joined the FootballScoop staff after serving as a college scout as well as an assistant coach at the college level, where he was fortunate enough to have coached every offensive position by age 24. Samuels is a lifelong Michigan State fan, no huddle enthusiast, and currently coaches high school football in West Michigan.